Cover Interview With Rapper, Producer & Businessman; E.L

Photographed by: Franklin Gyan Jr.

“Let me tell you something. The fact is if you sell your music purely to Ghanaians you will lose. Ghanaians music fans don’t buy music with hard currency – they patronize music with fandom.”

Eugene Ossei: It’s great to be talking to you today. How’s your new album doing?

E.L: It’s doing great. It was released a couple of weeks ago and fans love it.

E.O: Are you addressing social issues in your new album?

E.L: No I’m not, honestly. I am at a place in my life right now where I’ve realized that if things are going to change in our society then it has to be a conscious movement by the people affected – but that’s not the aim of this album. The aim of this album is to express my love for music and have as many people as possible to experience that. I didn’t go into this project to preach but to make music.

E.O: Who do you have on this album?

E.L: I have some of my favourites…I have the likes of Oxlaide and Sarkodie on it.

E.O: Which of the songs on the album will you say is your favourite?

E.L: I love all the songs on the album. They’re like my children. I don’t love them all the same but I love them – you know what I mean.

E.O: I know you’re a producer as well. What role did you play on this album?

E.L: I took the front seat on this album. I actually produced about 50% percent of the album with the rest being handled by producers like Pee OnDa Beat who is my go to person when it comes to beats.

E.O: Which comes easy to you – producing or performing?

E.L: There’s really no line drawn with this. It’s more like a Yin-Yang situation. They influence each other. There are times my beats influence the lyrics or vice versa. It’s inseparable for me.

E.O: Hammer of The Last Two has come out to say he’s going out of music to focus on his bread business, what’s your take on it?

E.L: It’s a very emotional game. If you don’t have the patience for it or you don’t have emotional capacity to handle all the drama, the backstabbing and cut throat nature of it – you won’t want to have anything to do with it. I have been at this place several times so I understand his decision to quit music and focus on his business which is going well for him. If it’s a passion thing you will always come back to it and I believe he’s very passionate about music but when responsibilities begin to pile up your focus changes. You begin to look out for things that will sustain you and your family. I think as a music artiste you need multiple sources of income to enable you focus on your passion.

E.O: You will hardly hear artistes in the West quit music to focus on business. Will you attribute Hammer’s decision to the state of Ghana’s music industry?

E.L: Let me tell you something. The fact is if you sell your music purely to Ghanaians you will lose. Ghanaians music fans don’t buy music with hard currency – they patronize music with fandom. You can’t prosper as a music artiste in Ghana buy selling music to Ghanaians. It’s challenging to make it here in Ghana as a music artiste.

Get the full interview in our October 2021 issue. Click the cover below to download it.


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